My podcast interview with David Capes about the beginnings of Luke and Acts

While I was in Houston recently, Dr David Capes, Director of the (amazing) Lanier Theological Library, interviewed me for the Stone Chapel podcast about the prologues to Luke and Acts and the connections between the two books. Here’s a direct link to the podcast; it’s also available on Google, Apple, Spotify and other platforms—but do also look This was a fun 20-minute conversation—do listen in and let me know what you think in the comments below.

Slides on Luke’s Gospel (part 1)

Here and here are links to download my slides from two talks about Luke’s Gospel which I’ve done for clergy and lay ministers from the diocese of Exeter, aiming to equip them to read and preach Luke over the coming year, when Luke is the ‘controlling’ Gospel in the lectionary used by Anglicans and others. I’ll add the third one tomorrow.

Some recent publications

It’s been a busy season the last few weeks for publications of things I’ve been asked to commend, plus one book I’ve contributed to myself, so here’s an update, with my comments in each case. ’Tricia Williams’ What Happens to Faith when Christians Get Dementia (Eugene, OR: Wipf & Stock, 2021) is a lightly revised doctoral thesis studying how some Christians from an evangelical tradition who are in early to middle stages of dementia experience their faith. It’s fine work, and essential for theological college Continue reading →

Remembering Larry Hurtado

The good folk at the Lexham Press blog have this week put up three excellent posts remembering the fine contributions Professor Larry Hurtado (who died a year ago this week) made to New Testament Studies, on textual criticism (by Tommy Wasserman), Christology (by Chris Tilling), and the Gospel of Mark (by Holly J. Carey). They’re well worth your time, and summarise beautifully the way Larry moved each of these fields forward through his scholarship. He’s one of a few giants who’ve left us in the Continue reading →

Bravo, Eric Clouston! A new book on Acts in its literary context

Eric Clouston, How Ancient Narratives Persuade: Acts in its Literary ContextLanham, MD: Fortress Academic/Rowman & Littlefield, 2020ISBN 978 1 9787 0660 6 I am delighted to receive my copy of my student Dr Eric Clouston’s revised doctoral thesis, How Ancient Narratives Persuade: Acts in its Literary Context. Scholars have long studied the speeches in Acts as persuasive; Eric looks at how the whole book functions as persuasion, by comparing it with other first-century Jewish writers: Philo, Josephus, the author of Joseph and Aseneth, and the Continue reading →