Slides on Luke’s Gospel (part 1)

Here and here are links to download my slides from two talks about Luke’s Gospel which I’ve done for clergy and lay ministers from the diocese of Exeter, aiming to equip them to read and preach Luke over the coming year, when Luke is the ‘controlling’ Gospel in the lectionary used by Anglicans and others. I’ll add the third one tomorrow.

Some recent publications

It’s been a busy season the last few weeks for publications of things I’ve been asked to commend, plus one book I’ve contributed to myself, so here’s an update, with my comments in each case. ’Tricia Williams’ What Happens to Faith when Christians Get Dementia (Eugene, OR: Wipf & Stock, 2021) is a lightly revised doctoral thesis studying how some Christians from an evangelical tradition who are in early to middle stages of dementia experience their faith. It’s fine work, and essential for theological college Continue reading →

Remembering Larry Hurtado

The good folk at the Lexham Press blog have this week put up three excellent posts remembering the fine contributions Professor Larry Hurtado (who died a year ago this week) made to New Testament Studies, on textual criticism (by Tommy Wasserman), Christology (by Chris Tilling), and the Gospel of Mark (by Holly J. Carey). They’re well worth your time, and summarise beautifully the way Larry moved each of these fields forward through his scholarship. He’s one of a few giants who’ve left us in the Continue reading →

Bravo, Eric Clouston! A new book on Acts in its literary context

Eric Clouston, How Ancient Narratives Persuade: Acts in its Literary ContextLanham, MD: Fortress Academic/Rowman & Littlefield, 2020ISBN 978 1 9787 0660 6 I am delighted to receive my copy of my student Dr Eric Clouston’s revised doctoral thesis, How Ancient Narratives Persuade: Acts in its Literary Context. Scholars have long studied the speeches in Acts as persuasive; Eric looks at how the whole book functions as persuasion, by comparing it with other first-century Jewish writers: Philo, Josephus, the author of Joseph and Aseneth, and the Continue reading →

Some helpful pieces on planning and study

I’ve been finding a number of really helpful pieces on different aspects of planning, research and study recently, and here share three of my favourites. Here is a belter of a piece by the wonderful Katherine Firth about ‘Taking a critical distance break’, explaining the very helpful process of stepping back from a project you’re engrossed in, to give yourself time and head space to see what’s really going on, what’s most important, how things fit together, etc. Here is a very helpful piece on Continue reading →