Tag Archives: scholarship

My paper about the significance of the authorship of Acts

A little while ago I put up the slides from my talk at the excellent conference on the pastoral implications of pseudepigrapha and anonymity in the New Testament, sponsored by the International Reference Library for Biblical Research, and held at the Lanier Theological Library in Houston, Texas. The organisers have now kindly made the video of my talk available (and the other talks from the conference) on YouTube, and you can access it above. And here’s a link to the YouTube page where you can Continue reading →

Recent and forthcoming publications

It’s been a bit of a busy time for publications for me, small and larger, so here’s a little update. The BRF Book of 365 Bible Reflections (Abingdon: BRF, 2021)The Bible Reading Fellowship have just published a lovely book of 365 daily Bible readings with notes for their centenary, with lots of different people writing the notes, including many famous people. I had the fun of writing one of the notes, on Luke 18:10-14 on How (not) to pray (it’s on page 105 if you’re Continue reading →

A new book on healing and exorcism in second temple Judaism and the New Testament

Mikael Tellbe & Tommy Wasserman, eds.Healing and Exorcism in Second Temple Judaism and Early ChristianityWUNT 2/511; Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2019; ISBN 978-3-16-158936-2 Another month, another new book! Just out from Mohr Siebeck is this collection of essays from an excellent conference hosted by Tommy Wasserman and Mikael Tellbe at the theological college in Örebro, Sweden. I hugely enjoyed participating in the conference (see my report here), and am now delighted to see the revised papers published—with one or two additions, including a very helpful essay Continue reading →

A fascinating discussion of Matthew Novenson’s The Grammar of Messianism

There’s a really interesting conversation about Matthew Novenson’s fascinating The Grammar of Messianism going on at Syndicate, the home of many such book discussions, at present. A key claim of the book is that it helps to think about ‘Messiah’ passages in Jewish and Christian texts as engaging in a ‘language game’ in which they use the term in a variety of ways—and this is better than the ‘idealist’ tradition of constructing one view of ‘Messiah’ and then reading the texts in the light of Continue reading →