Tag Archives: Paul

Susan Eastman’s valuable review of John Barclay’s Paul and the Gift

   I was delighted yesterday to read a good medium-length review of John Barclay’s excellent Paul and the Gift (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2016) by Susan Eastman of Duke University (who is no mean Paul scholar herself). I’m greatly enjoying reading through and discussing this book with our NT research reading group in our Centre for the Social-Scientific Study of the Bible at St Mary’s University, Twickenham (of which, more anon, I think). This is a vital book in Pauline studies which everyone in the field will want to Continue reading →

In the footsteps of Judas (TV show)

I was thinking I’d write a review/summary of the BBC show In the Footsteps of Judas, shown on BBC1 on Good Friday—but Ian Paul has done such a good job that I’ll simply point you to his blog on the show. In sum: a very worthwhile show with good scholars (Simon Gathercole, Helen Bond, Joan Taylor, Anthony Cane, Peter Stanford) and a good presenter holding the thread together (Kate Bottley, of Gogglebox fame). Well worth an hour of your time—still available for another 25 days on iPlayer here.

Vicky Balabanski responds to Richard Fellows

I am pleased to host a response by Dr Vicky Balabanski to a blog piece by Richard Fellows critiquing her recent important article ‘Where is Philemon? The Case for a Logical Fallacy in the Correlation of the Data in Philemon and Colossians 1.1-2; 4.7-18’, JSNT 38 (2015), 131-50 (you’ll need access to JSNT online to see the full pdf here). Here’s the abstract of Dr Balabanski’s article: Based on the internal evidence of the letters to Philemon and to the Colossians (Col. 1.1-2; 4.7-18), this article contends that Continue reading →

Au revoir, Professor I. Howard Marshall (1934–2015)

I share others’ sadness (such as Mark Goodacre, Tyndale House, Darrell Bock, and Ray van Neste—and now [21 December] Ian Paul) in reporting the passing of I. Howard Marshall on Saturday 12 December. Howard (as he always asked to be known) was for many years Professor of New Testament Exegesis at the University of Aberdeen, and latterly Professor Emeritus. He was a lovely human being, a delightful Christian man, and an outstanding scholar and teacher—not least of the many PhD students he supervised. I first met him when I Continue reading →

Engaging with Poverty in the Early Church and Today—report

Well, two excellent days of conference are over and we’ve heard some 15 papers and two short reflections on the whole conference, as well as engaging in eight half-hour question and discussion times. It’s been very stimulating with fine talks, passion and a sense of the importance of the issues we’ve discussed. And all this grew out of a conversation over coffee after the morning service one Sunday between Chris Keith and David Parish—on this evidence, let’s have more of those kinds of conversations, please! The conference was Continue reading →