Tag Archives: Biblical Studies

John Goldingay’s The Old Testament for Everyone series

It is my custom to read the whole Bible every year in my daily Bible reading, and I try to ring the changes on the system I use to do that each year. Over the year recently ended (I am not good at beginning exactly on 1 January!) I was using a reading system set up by a particular organisation and I became irritated by the devotional comments provided with the readings—some were just plain wrong, and lots were at best poor exegesis of the Continue reading →

A new book: Poverty in the Early Church and Today—A Conversation

I’m delighted to announce the publication of a new book which I’ve co-edited with Hannah Swithinbank of Tearfund, Poverty in the Early Church and Today—A Conversation (London: Bloomsbury T&T Clark, 2019). Here’s an abstract for the whole book: Poverty, its causes and alleviation, are a perennial concern for humanity, and particularly for Christians because of their belief that all people are made in God’s image, and therefore valued and valuable. This book offers creative engagement with issues concerning people in poverty by bringing into conversation perspectives from the earliest church and today’s world. Continue reading →

Closing the Gap: a very worthwhile conference in Durham (1)

        I’ve spent a very enjoyable and stimulating couple of days in Durham this week at an excellent conference, ‘Closing the Gap: Best Practices for Integrating Historical and Theological Exegesis’ hosted by the Theology and Religion department of the university, and initiated and organised by two enterprising PhD students, Ben White and Justin Allison. Both had found that their PhD work in New Testament had raised theological questions which their supervisor, Prof. John Barclay, had encouraged them to pursue and to integrate into their Continue reading →

I (Still) Believe—a helpful (and very varied) book

No, not this, but a book of that title which appeared in 2015, edited by John Byron and Joel N. Lohr, from Zondervan. In it a bunch of stellar biblical scholars write about how faith and academic biblical studies have gone together for them. The answers are very, very varied, as you might imagine. There’s a common thread for many of the North American contributors (about ⅔ of the authors) of ‘I grew up in fundamentalism, discovered it was more complicated than that, and here’s Continue reading →

A valuable video on LXX lexicography by William A. Ross

Here’s an excellent introductory short (6 minutess 37 seconds) video by my friend Will Ross on Septuagint lexicography from the Daily Dose of Greek vlog. He helpfully introduces the theme, and illustrates well by showing differences in approach in the two main Septuagint Greek lexical (Lust, Eynikel and Hauspie, and Muraoka). Worth a few minutes of your life!