First thoughts on Muraoka’s grammar of Septuagint Greek from Will Ross

My good friend Will Ross, a Cambridge PhD student working on the Septuagint, has provided a ‘first thoughts’ review of Takamitsu Muraoka’s new grammar of Septuagint Greek, A Syntax of Septuagint Greek (Leuven: Peeters, 2016). Muraoka is a master of Greek, especially on the LXX, and has already provided us with a superb lexicon (see Will’s video introduction) and Hebrew-Greek index of the LXX, both of which must be considered the ‘state of the art’. Here’s the ‘blurb’ on the book: This is the first ever comprehensive Continue reading →

Professor John Webster (1955–2016)

I’m very sad to record the death of Professor John Webster of St Andrew’s University on Tuesday 24 May at the (young) age of 60 (he and I were born only a couple of weeks apart in 1955). John was a giant among systematic theologians—indeed, theologians of any type—and a godly Christian man with a deep faith. I’m particularly sorry that we won’t see the commentary on Ephesians which he was intending to write. I knew him in my Cambridge days, when he was doing a Continue reading →

Further on a shocking sentence—a different correspondence

In addition to writing to the Church Times about the shocking sentence in a review of Anthony Thiselton’s Systematic Theology, I wrote to the author of the review, the Revd Dr Edward Dowler. He’s expressed willingness for me to share his response publicly, and I’m pleased to do so, particularly given that he clarifies below that he had not intended his sentence to be understood as critical of evangelicals as unlearned and unbalanced. I think from our correspondence that he now recognises that his wording was Continue reading →

A shocking sentence and a correspondence

I wrote to the Church Times over the weekend because of a shocking sentence in a book review by the Revd Dr Edward Dowler of Anthony Thiselton’s new book Systematic Theology (London: SPCK, 2015). Here it is: Although Thiselton comes from the Evangelical end of the Anglican spectrum, he is, on the whole, balanced, and his range of reference is wide. [my italics] I was shocked and dismayed at the patronising implication that Thiselton is an exception to the norm, since he is an evangelical who reads widely, Continue reading →