Tag Archives: writing

Chris Green on the excellent Full Focus Planner

I could write my own enthusiastic review of Michael Hyatt’s Full Focus Planner, a planning/diary tool developed from his limpidly clear thinking on how to organise your life to achieve the things which are important (rather than trying to cram even more into the limited time you have)—but Chris Green has done such a good job that I refer you to Chris’ excellent review of the (new) third edition. I’m loving using this tool alongside the digital  Nozbe as my project software.

Offer: Bible reading notes for Sept to Dec this year

I’ve had the fun of writing daily Bible reading notes on Luke for Bible Reading Fellowship’s Guidelines notes, and the first chunk, covering the infancy narratives in Luke 1–2, appears in the edition just published. The whole set of readings looks great, and includes notes by my doctoral supervisor Andrew Lincoln, my former colleagues Steve Motyer and Miriam Hinksman (née Bier), and my (former) doctoral student Fiona Gregson. Here’s the offer: Bible Reading Fellowship have offered to send a free set of these notes to Continue reading →

My Morning Routine: reflections on reading this book

Benjamin Spall & Michael Xander, My Morning Routine London: Portfolio Penguin, 2018 This is a fascinating and easy-to-read book which has caused me to reflect carefully on what I do in the mornings. In the last few months I’ve been working with Michael Hyatt’s ideas on ordering your life so that you achieve the things you believe to be important to achieve, and one of his themes is about structuring your morning routine (he calls it ‘morning ritual’) so that you make a good start to Continue reading →

Two helpful recent productivity and writing posts

  Here are two recent posts which I’m finding helpful. The first is from patter (Professor Pat Thomson) about a new collection of short essays critiquing bad ideas about writing (which mostly seem to be US-based and derive from Strunk and White’s key book). Her summary is both clear and helpful (and a model of how to do so), and there is also a link to the book, which is freely available in digital format. The other is from the Nozbe team, and gives seven Continue reading →

Some useful blogs for study and research

Here are a six of my favourite blogs which offer helpful material to help doing with study and research—and the organisation required to accomplish those things. I thought others might be interested; please share other blogs and websites you have found helpful in the comments. Study Hacks is Cal Newport’s blog. He is the author of the superb books Deep Work and So Good They Can’t Ignore You, and teaches and researches in Computer Science at Georgetown University in Washington, DC. Cal is simply excellent at Continue reading →