Tag Archives: learning

My new role at Trinity College, Bristol

After leaving St Mary’s University, Twickenham at the end of December 2017, I am delighted to announce that I’ve now joined Trinity College, Bristol as an Associate Research Fellow, to supervise research students through their PhD and MTh research programme, which is validated by the University of Aberdeen. This means I’m available to supervise research students starting this autumn/fall, full-time or part-time, including at distance. The plan is that I’ll also lead a regular New Testament research seminar online for staff and research students all Continue reading →

Review of Deep Work by Cal Newport

Here’s a helpful review of Cal Newport’s outstandingly good book Deep Work, a book which I read with great profit when it first came out. It’s by Imogen Mathew, and found on the Thesis Whisperer, a very useful and readable blog for those involved in PhD work (and their supervisors—I find it very helpful). Thanks Imogen and Inger Mewburn!

Sean Adams on the ‘Being Jewish, Writing Greek’ conference

This is a guest post by my good friend Dr Sean Adams, Lecturer in New Testament and Ancient Culture at the University of Glasgow (picture above), on the conference ‘Being Jewish, Writing Greek’ hosted recently by the University of Cambridge. I’m very grateful to Sean for his willingness to share this summary of what was clearly an excellent and highly stimulating conference. Sean Adams writes… It was my privilege to attend and present at the ‘Being Jewish, Writing Greek’ conference that was held at Cambridge University Continue reading →

Larry Hurtado and Lea Keck on whether the NT is a ‘field of study’

     In case you missed it, here’s a fascinating post by Larry Hurtado, based on a very interesting article by Leander Keck about whether we should consider the New Testament as a ‘field of study’ separate from other early Christian literature. Hurtado’s conclusion is particularly interesting to me: In short, for theological purposes the NT is (and should be) a “privileged” body of texts.  But for historical purposes we should both take account of the breadth and diversity of early Christian literature and also Continue reading →

Suse McBay on spiritual growth through her PhD

The Revd Suse McBay Here’s the second piece on how someone grew spiritually through doing a PhD, this time by Suse McBay, who is awaiting a viva shortly (if you’re a person who prays, say one for her, please). Interestingly, she and Gabby Thomas (who wrote the previous piece) were at St John’s College, Nottingham training for ordination at the same time. Suse is now associate rector for adult education at St Martin’s Church, Houston, Texas. My warm thanks to her for being willing to Continue reading →