Tag Archives: Luke-Acts

The Urban World and the First Christians

I’m delighted to be able to share with you the opening pages of our new book which has very recently appeared from Eerdmans. I had the honour of editing this book with my excellent colleagues Paul Trebilco (University of Otago, New Zealand) and David Gill (University of Suffolk). These pages include the contents, authors, and the introductory chapter, which summarises the contents of each chapter. That should give you a good flavour of the book and (hopefully) encourage you to ask your librarian to order Continue reading →

Full video of my inaugural lecture now online!

I’ve now been able, thanks to the techies at St Mary’s University, Twickenham, to make my full inaugural professorial lecture ‘Doing Theology Lukewise: Luke as Theologian and Storyteller’, with the slides inserted at appropriate points, available as a video. This is an improvement on the facebook live version, which doesn’t have the slides and which (because of a technical glitch) lacks the first few minutes of the lecture. That said, the facebook live version has the question time at the end, which the university’s version Continue reading →

A podcast on the ascension book

David Bryan, one of the editors, has done a podcast on the book on the ascension of Jesus in Luke-Acts to which I contributed, Ascent into Heaven in Luke-Acts. He talks a good deal about the topic and the wider context of the book—and says some very helpful things about his own contribution to the book. Just over 44 minutes long. Worth a listen.

Slides for my inaugural lecture, ‘Doing Theology Lukewise’, to download

   Here in pdf format are the slides for my inaugural lecture ‘Doing Theology Lukewise: Luke as theologian and storyteller‘, which I deliver at 6 pm on Monday 15 May 2017. If you’re going to follow the lecture through the Facebook Live page, then please do download the slides to help you to follow the lecture. The Facebook Live link will be open around 6 pm on my Facebook page (Steve Walton). See you there! (And thanks to my friend Dr Conrad Gempf for the Continue reading →