Tag Archives: scholarship

The ‘evil book’ is out!

I’m delighted to say that the book arising from our excellent conference on evil in second temple Judaism and early Christianity in the Centre for the Social-Scientific Study of the Bible at St Mary’s University, Twickenham, held in May 2014, is now out and available from Mohr Siebeck. Edited by my excellent colleague Chris Keith and Loren Stuckenbruck, it’s a splendid collection of excellent material from a stellar collection of contributors which will fill a real gap in scholarship. Here’s a listing of the contents: Christopher A. Rollston: An Continue reading →

First thoughts on Muraoka’s grammar of Septuagint Greek from Will Ross

My good friend Will Ross, a Cambridge PhD student working on the Septuagint, has provided a ‘first thoughts’ review of Takamitsu Muraoka’s new grammar of Septuagint Greek, A Syntax of Septuagint Greek (Leuven: Peeters, 2016). Muraoka is a master of Greek, especially on the LXX, and has already provided us with a superb lexicon (see Will’s video introduction) and Hebrew-Greek index of the LXX, both of which must be considered the ‘state of the art’. Here’s the ‘blurb’ on the book: This is the first ever comprehensive Continue reading →

Professor John Webster (1955–2016)

I’m very sad to record the death of Professor John Webster of St Andrew’s University on Tuesday 24 May at the (young) age of 60 (he and I were born only a couple of weeks apart in 1955). John was a giant among systematic theologians—indeed, theologians of any type—and a godly Christian man with a deep faith. I’m particularly sorry that we won’t see the commentary on Ephesians which he was intending to write. I knew him in my Cambridge days, when he was doing a Continue reading →

Susan Eastman’s valuable review of John Barclay’s Paul and the Gift

   I was delighted yesterday to read a good medium-length review of John Barclay’s excellent Paul and the Gift (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2016) by Susan Eastman of Duke University (who is no mean Paul scholar herself). I’m greatly enjoying reading through and discussing this book with our NT research reading group in our Centre for the Social-Scientific Study of the Bible at St Mary’s University, Twickenham (of which, more anon, I think). This is a vital book in Pauline studies which everyone in the field will want to Continue reading →