Tag Archives: New Testament Studies

Judy Redman on the parable of the wheat and weeds (tares)

Here’s a great piece by Judy Redman from her blog about the parable of the wheat and weeds (tares) in Matthew 13:24-30—well worth reading. I’m particularly struck by the way she uses her training in agriculture to inform her reading of this parable and to show how much sense it makes in the first century, where agricultural practices were different to day. I love the fact that there was a law against people spreading darnel seed among wheat seed, which suggests that Jesus’ scenario in Continue reading →

Two scintillating links

Here are two scintillatingly good links to pieces I’ve really enjoyed watching (the video) and reading (Joel Green’s article). The video is a short (12 mins) talk by Ian McGilchrist, author of The Master and His Emissary, one of the most interesting books of recent times. McGilchrist is a neuroscientist who reflects seriously, and non-superficially, about the relation of the two hemispheres of the brain, and rejects the popular ‘left brain = rational, right brain = creative’ approach. He draws fascinating implications for the dominance of Continue reading →

Library of NT Studies latest

Mark Goodacre, the series editor, blogs here about the newest volumes in the excellent Library of New Testament Studies series, published by T. & T. Clark/Bloomsbury. I’m delighted that the volume A Scriptural Theology of Eucharistic Blessings by my student Susan Bubbers (who blogs here) is among them—this is a revised version of her excellent PhD thesis. In the interests of full disclosure, I’m on the Editorial Board of this fine series.

Andrew Perriman on how the gospel, the story of Israel, and personal salvation tie up

Here’s a worthwhile and stimulating piece by Andrew Perriman on his blog. Andrew doesn’t know how to be dull: here he engages with Scot McKnight and others on the question of how the intervention of Jesus in the history of Israel relates to a gospel of ‘personal salvation’. I’d love to see him join the dots up to how Christians today should proclaim ‘the gospel’ to post-moderns…