Tag Archives: New Testament Studies

Slides from my talk for the Healing and Exorcism conference

I’m in Örebro, Sweden at a conference on ‘Healing and Exorcism in Second Temple Judaism and Early Christianity’. (The picture is one of the two amazing cakes we had for dessert at the dinner!) My paper is about why Paul silences the demonised slave girl in Philippi (Acts 16:16-18), and I connect it with the silencing of a demonised man by Jesus in Luke 4:33-37. Here are the title and abstract of my paper, and this link will open a pdf of my slides. Why Continue reading →

My new role at Trinity College, Bristol

After leaving St Mary’s University, Twickenham at the end of December 2017, I am delighted to announce that I’ve now joined Trinity College, Bristol as an Associate Research Fellow, to supervise research students through their PhD and MTh research programme, which is validated by the University of Aberdeen. This means I’m available to supervise research students starting this autumn/fall, full-time or part-time, including at distance. The plan is that I’ll also lead a regular New Testament research seminar online for staff and research students all Continue reading →

Slides from my talks on ‘Becoming and nurturing a more confident people of God’

Here are links to download the slides from my three main talks for the parish weekend away for St Andrew’s Church, Histon (near Cambridge—picture of their lovely building above), mainly for the St Andrew’s folk, but others are welcome to have them if interested. These aren’t ‘academic’ talks, but are me seeking to bring New Testament scholarship to bear on the question the organisers asked me to address: “How do we become and nurture a more confident people of God?’ The slides are available here: Continue reading →

The Urban World and the First Christians

I’m delighted to be able to share with you the opening pages of our new book which has very recently appeared from Eerdmans. I had the honour of editing this book with my excellent colleagues Paul Trebilco (University of Otago, New Zealand) and David Gill (University of Suffolk). These pages include the contents, authors, and the introductory chapter, which summarises the contents of each chapter. That should give you a good flavour of the book and (hopefully) encourage you to ask your librarian to order Continue reading →