Tag Archives: New Testament Studies

Slides from study day on Matthew’s Gospel

I led a study day for preachers on Matthew in Nottingham recently—mainly Methodist lay preachers and ministers. I’m here sharing the slides from the three sessions where I gave input: one introducing Matthew and looking particularly at his use of the Old Testament; one introducing Tom Wright’s four ‘loudspeakers’ for listening to the Gospels in relation to Matthew; and one walking through Matthew 8–9. What resources have you found helpful for study Matthew, which will be the ‘controlling’ Gospel in the Revised Common Lectionary from Continue reading →

Get our book, Poverty in the Early Church and Today: A Conversation, in pdf for free!

I’m very pleased to announce that the wonderful people at Bloomsbury T&T Clark have agreed with the website Knowledge Unlatched to make Poverty in the Early Church and Today: A Conversation, the book which Hannah Swithinbank and I edited available online for free. We’re delighted, as we were keen to make the book freely accessible to people in the developing world—but our publishers have gone one better in making it freely available to anyone. For more about the book, see here and here. The download Continue reading →

Sharing possessions in Acts

I recently gave a paper to a joint meeting of the Book of Acts and Use and Influence of the New Testament seminars at the British New Testament Society meeting in Liverpool. My full paper, offering an exegetical discussion of the sharing of possessions in Acts, especially in the early chapters, continues to be available for download for a short time here. It’s strictly work in progress, so please don’t cite it as a published work. I’d welcome feedback and comments. I’m also now making Continue reading →

A fascinating discussion of Matthew Novenson’s The Grammar of Messianism

There’s a really interesting conversation about Matthew Novenson’s fascinating The Grammar of Messianism going on at Syndicate, the home of many such book discussions, at present. A key claim of the book is that it helps to think about ‘Messiah’ passages in Jewish and Christian texts as engaging in a ‘language game’ in which they use the term in a variety of ways—and this is better than the ‘idealist’ tradition of constructing one view of ‘Messiah’ and then reading the texts in the light of Continue reading →

An interview about my book The Urban World and the First Christians

Tavis Bohlinger of the Logos Academic blog recently interviewed David Gill, Paul Trebilco and me about our edited book The Urban World and the First Christians (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2017), and combined the result with some fab photos of Corinth and Philippi taken by David Gill. The interview is here. The good news is that the book is now available electronically from Logos, here at a bargain price! For my summary of the book and links to other material about it, see here, and for my summary Continue reading →