Review: John Barclay’s new booklet on grace in Paul

Can you sum up a massive (672 pages) book in 28 pages? Professor John Barclay demonstrates in this fine Grove Biblical booklet that the answer is ‘Yes’. I had the privilege of being in a reading group which worked through Barclay’s big book, Paul and the Gift (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2015) in the earlier part of this year, and I am hugely impressed that he has such a good grasp of his own argument that he can express it both clearly and succinctly—an ability that many academics would Continue reading →

First thoughts on Muraoka’s grammar of Septuagint Greek from Will Ross

My good friend Will Ross, a Cambridge PhD student working on the Septuagint, has provided a ‘first thoughts’ review of Takamitsu Muraoka’s new grammar of Septuagint Greek, A Syntax of Septuagint Greek (Leuven: Peeters, 2016). Muraoka is a master of Greek, especially on the LXX, and has already provided us with a superb lexicon (see Will’s video introduction) and Hebrew-Greek index of the LXX, both of which must be considered the ‘state of the art’. Here’s the ‘blurb’ on the book: This is the first ever comprehensive Continue reading →

Further on a shocking sentence—a different correspondence

In addition to writing to the Church Times about the shocking sentence in a review of Anthony Thiselton’s Systematic Theology, I wrote to the author of the review, the Revd Dr Edward Dowler. He’s expressed willingness for me to share his response publicly, and I’m pleased to do so, particularly given that he clarifies below that he had not intended his sentence to be understood as critical of evangelicals as unlearned and unbalanced. I think from our correspondence that he now recognises that his wording was Continue reading →

A shocking sentence and a correspondence

I wrote to the Church Times over the weekend because of a shocking sentence in a book review by the Revd Dr Edward Dowler of Anthony Thiselton’s new book Systematic Theology (London: SPCK, 2015). Here it is: Although Thiselton comes from the Evangelical end of the Anglican spectrum, he is, on the whole, balanced, and his range of reference is wide. [my italics] I was shocked and dismayed at the patronising implication that Thiselton is an exception to the norm, since he is an evangelical who reads widely, Continue reading →